August 1st, 2016 by Joonas Rokka

We’re super happy to tell that me, Joel and Doug Brownlie are going to be guest editors for an exciting upcoming Videography Special Issue in Journal of Marketing Management titled “Screening Marketing: Videography and the Expanding Horizons of Filmic Research“.

It’s a fantastic opportunity for all research filmmakers to embrace video in a variety of ways. Notably, we’re accepting film submissions. As far as we know, our “film only” submission format is presented for the first time ever in a renown academic journal. In addition, it’s possible to send “film plus commentary” pieces as well as classic written papers.

This is an astronomic step towards making video an even more legit research format. We hope the special issue will open new doors and spur new creative thinking and approaches in research that is in tune with “era of video” we currently live in. Feel free to be in contact with us should you wish to inquire about submissions or requirements. Submissions are due November 1, 2016.

See the detailed Call for Papers behind the link HERE.

Screening_marketing

January 18th, 2016 by Joonas Rokka

This list hopes to facilitate access to full-length consumer research videographies screened previously in conferences (e.g. ACR, CCT, EMAC) or journals (e.g. CMC, QMR) over the last 10 years that are “free to view” online. I find it a common problem that many of the films are scattered around the net and difficult to find when needed. They are an excellent resource and certainly merit more attention – not to mention citations!

I reviewed all consumer research conference proceedings and journal special issues that I know have presented films. Then I tried my best to track down each film across video streaming sites or authors to see if they are available online (in full, free access). Please notify me if your film is still missing – I’d be happy to add all! I found a total of 33 films from 2005-2015. With an average 700+ views these films also prove they reach far beyond standard conference audiences.

Find here the full list (CLICK THE TITLE TO ACCESS FILMS):

2015

Cléret, Baptiste (2015) “Street Corner Compromises” ACR

Hietanen, Joel and Joonas Rokka (2015) “Monstrous Organizing: The Dubstep Electronic Music Scene” CCT / ACR / EMAC

 

2014

Bonnin, Gael, Alain Goudey and Marat Bakpayev (2014) “Meet the robot: Nao’s chronicle” ACR / EMAC

Rokka, Joonas, Pekka Rousi, and Vessi Hämäläinen (2014) “Follow me on dead media: analog authenticities in alternative skateboarding scene” ACR

van Laer, Tom, Luca Visconti and Stephanie Feiereisen (2014) “Need for narrative” ACR 

Veer, Ekant (2014) “I am struggling: men’s stories of mental illness” ACR

Wijland, Roel (2014) “In brutal times” ACR

 

2013

Myöhänen, Henri and Joel Hietanen (2013) “Entertained to excess: The contemporary practices of boredom” ACR

O’Sullivan, Stephen (2013) “What happens when brand evangelism meets entrepreneurship? Introducing the second tier tribal entrepreneur” EACR

Ramachandran, Giridhar (2013) “Consumption communities as third spaces” ACR

Rokka, Joonas, Baptiste Cléret and Alice Sohier (2013) “Entre-deux-mondes: the shaping of artistic projects in a local music scene” ACR

Seregina, Anastasia, Norah Cambell, Bernardo Figueiredo and Hannu Uotila (2013) “A Pen” ACR

 

2012

Barretta, Paul and Yi-Chia Wu (2012) “Perceptions of music authenticity” ACR

Viitala, Karolus and Hietanen, Joel (2012) “Differing everydays – Planning and emergence in contemporary mundane routines” ACR

 

2011

Hietanen, Joel, Joonas Rokka, and Risto Roman (2011) “Pushing the scene – tensions and emergence in an accelerated marketplace culture” ACR / EACR

Hu, Anne and Curtis Haugvegt (2011) “Changing consumer behavior in diet and health” ACR

Uotila, Hannu and Joel Hietanen (2011) “Post-materialist work: Emerging self-actualization in the video industry” ACR

 

2010

Caldwell, Marylouise and Ingeborg Kleppe (2010) “Walk the talk: Living positive with HIV” ACR

Castano, Raquel, Maria Eugenia Perez and Claudia Quintanilla (2010) “Cross-border shopping: family narratives” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 45-57.

Cherrier, Hélène and Tresa Ponnor (2010) “Trash in the eye of the beholder” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 8-23.

Rabikowska, Marta (2010) “Whose street is it anyway? Visual ethnography and self-reflection” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 58-83.

Webster, Cynthia, Richard Seymour and Kate Dallenbach (2010) “Behind closed doors: opportunity identification through observational research” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 24-35.

 

2009

Eckhardt, Giana and Andreas Bengtsson (2009) “Naturalistic group interviewing in China” ACR / (2010) Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 36-44.

Fleck, Joao Pedro, Carlos Rossi and Nicolas Tonsho (2009) “Vinileiros” ACR

Rokka, Joonas, Joel Hietanen and Kristine DeValck (2009) “Brothers in paint: a practice-oriented inquiry to tribal marketplace culture” ACR

 

2008

Caldwell, Marylouise and Paul Henry (2008) “Urban archetypal hedonistas” ACR / (2010) Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 84-96.

Veer, Ekant (2008) “This day is to be special: The role of exaggerated contrast in the Indian wedding” ACR

 

2007 

Henry, Paul and Marylouise Caldwell (2007) “A right to life: reducing maternal death in Pakistan” ACR

Kjeldgaard, Dannie and Jacob Östberg (2007) “Coffee Grounds and the Global Cup” Consumption Markets and Culture, Vol. 10, No. 2, 175-187.

 

2006

Caldwell, Marylouise and Paul Henry (2006) “Headbanging as resistance or refuge?” ACR

Ulusoy, Ebru (2006) “Not Desperate Houswives”, ACR

 

2005

Bengtsson, Andreas, Jacob Östberg and Dannie Kjeldgaard (2005) “Prisoners in paradise: subcultural resistance to the marketization of tattooing” Consumption Markets and Culture, Vol 8, No. 3, 261-274.

Bergvall, Sven and Jacob Östberg (2005) “Burning Bock” ACR

 

 

December 3rd, 2015 by Joonas Rokka

Endorsed by the Lifestyle Cluster, Transforming Markets & Changing Lifestyles Research Center, and Department of Markets & Innovation at EMLYON Business School, the first Lyon Videography Workshop took place at the Ecully campus as a two-day intensive research workshop that welcomed a group of researchers, Phd students and practitioners inspired of doing research on video media.

This was already the fifth Videography Workshop event I’ve had the chance to be part of organising. This time I invited Hannu Uotila as a co-organizer. He is a top European film producer and CEO of an audio-visually focused market research company (Sailer Ltd.) based in Finland. Combining our prior experience in academic and professional, commercial film production allowed an interesting setup for discussions and perspectives into what is currently emerging as a novel research practice.

We were a total of 13 participants, a highly international group representing 8 nationalities (France, Finland, Scotland, USA, Peru, Turkey, Morocco, Germany) and varying professional backgrounds. Notably, we had EMLYON marketing faculty (4), Phd students (3), external marketing professors (3), and external professionals (3). Only few participants had prior filmmaking experience.

The 2-day program was, as one could imagine, action-packed. We begun with important theoretical and ontological considerations about what doing research on video means and entails, drawing on assigned pre-readings and films. We then covered important videographic research streams, as well as modes and approaches to filmmaking (notably visual ethnography and documentary film). Thereafter, reflected on insights from prior videography projects and illuminated the process of filmmaking – including pre-production, production and post-production.

After the theory part we engaged into hands-on videography projects that were completed from inception to finish within 24h. Each participant had brought an idea about research-inspired short film that could be filmed and edited within the limits of time/space of the workshop. We collectively chose two topics that were then pursued in two teams, under supervision. We assigned appropriate roles for each team-member: director, producer, director of photography, script supervisor, and photographer/editor. Enacting these roles made it not only possible for us to complete our highly challenging filmmaking tasks but also taught various tasks and points of view necessary for building compelling filmic experiences. Both resulting films, 3 min each, were completed and finalised in time, and then screened at the workshop concluding “Film festival” where films and filmmaking experiences were further exchanged.

The learnings of the workshop were many. Here is a list of some of the evident ones:

  1. Doing films is a practice that requires careful planning and focus. Poor planning, on the other hand, results in unusable or missing footage and thus unfinished or poor films. This is why we spent time working on scripts and storyboarding (we really could have used even more time doing so!) before touching the cameras.
  2. Doing films is necessarily teamwork and thus the best result comes when the team functions seamlessly, flexibly yet according to the plan (script + storyboard).
  3. Filming is all about being ready for the unexpected, facilitation of the potential for something interesting to emerge.
  4. Filmmaking is all about access. Therefore negotiating access to the studied phenomenon needs to be considered and planned as well.
  5. Justification of all choices. Be it your story, camera angle, argument, talking heads, mood, background music, voiceover, transitions, b-reel footage – always ask: “why do I need this element for my film?”

After the official program we visited the Institut Lumière for an intriguing history lesson on filmmaking. This was important as the moving image has indeed been invented in Lyon!

Next up: the 2nd Lyon Videography Workshop will be organized as a 2,5 day event on 16-18 May 2016, just before the French Marketing Association conference (AFM). There are still some places available, so be quick to reserve. Apply by sending email to joonas.rokka(at)gmail.com

Some pics from the workshop:

1

4

5

3

2

May 30th, 2015 by Joonas Rokka

Academic videography productions taking some important steps this week as the film festival was introduced to European Marketing Academy’s yearly conference for the first time. This is excellent news making it possible for filmmakers to submit their work to number of major venues. In addition to ACR conference (Association for Consumer Research) – where the pioneering film work has become a staple feature since 2002 – other options at the moment include for example CCT (Consumer Culture Theory conference), AFM (French Marketing Association) and JNRC (French consumer research conference). This is absolutely great, and we really hope spread even further. Next major conference to invite videographies is the Winter AMA 2016 (American Marketing Assoc). Please send your work!!

The EMAC film track where we joined offered five very nice films touching topics as diverse as consumers’ need for narratives, heterotopic tourist experiences, robots, and electronic music markets. Find the film trailers behind the link here. Our film is a completely new edit of our previously made, award-winning Pushing the Scene (2011) film with a specific focus on exploring how contemporary music scenes and markets come into being and dissipate and how they are negotiated in a complex relationship between the marginal and the mainstream, commercial interests, technologies and ideologies. We conceptualize this evolution in the film as “monstrous organizing” and thus extend prior market and consumer research studies on market dynamics. Check the trailer here (we will make the full film available later): https://vimeo.com/127473931

Monstrous_organizing

October 11th, 2014 by Joonas Rokka

The ACR Film Festival hits off again in two weeks time with new exciting consumer research films.

Here’s a teaser for our latest contribution. Follow Me on Dead Media is a piece exploring the “turn to analog” as a particular countercultural movement addressing the ever digitalizing mediascape. The study is based on recent fieldwork in skateboarding scene in Helsinki.

See you in Baltimore!

Ps. The entire film will be posted here after the conference (24.-26.10.2014).

January 24th, 2014 by Joonas Rokka

Can’t stop this! I had the pleasure of facilitating a two-day Videography Workshop a couple of weeks ago (something similar we organized at Rouen Business School last year). This time we gathered at the Delft University of Technology in Holland that proved to be a fantastic site for the event: the entire facility was well-versed for creative work with massive open working spaces, several “real” workshops with tools and machines, and everywhere around us students working on their product design sketches and projects – in fact, many of them were doing films right on the spot.

TUDelft

TUDelft

We had work planned for two days with a brilliant group of 15 aspiring videographers. The main objective was to consider how to embrace video media in our academic work. The program was loaded, as one might expect: we started off by analyzing various streams filmmaking – including documentary, ethnographic, experimental, artistic filmmaking – from their theoretical, stylistic and practical underpinnings and approaches, followed by a more hands-on part where we set out to test our filmmaking skills by producing short films, and by going through the different details in production phases of pre-production, shoot, and edit. As a result, we produced two short films (2-3 minutes each) in a matter of hours of highly effective and creative teamwork. The highlight was the screening of the films at the “film festival”.

Two stunning quality films from first-timers, I must say! To reflect a bit on what we did, our main filming task was to come up with a compelling audio-visual story that would address one of the key strategic areas of TUDelft – namely sustainability, health, behavioral change, or technological innovation. This proved a pretty challenging task taken that we did not have much time to go into these topics before starting. Yet, time and energy was won by applying state-of-the-art storyboarding methods in crafting the filmic stories, and appropriate division of responsibilities in terms of film production – in directing, scripting, shooting, sound recording, editing etc. As we progressed the action-packed two-day schedule, the groups proved that doing films is all about: TEAMWORK, PLANNING, CREATIVITY, and FOCUS. I believe these are the big secrets in getting some serious filming done.

Overall the workshop can be considered bon succès thanks to all participants, and especially to Prof Maria Sääksjärvi who made the workshop possible in the first place. Find enclosed some snaps from the action. Can’t wait for the next one!!

Storyboard

Storyboarding…

Group_1

Editing…

Group_2

… more editing …

Screen_project

One film was about the way we increasingly live our lives through the screen

Motorola

The other was about memories of obsolete objects that live on

Polaroid

Including cameras

Video_cam_VHS

Wonder how fast our videography gear is getting old…



April 6th, 2013 by Joonas Rokka

Two weeks ago 15 enthusiastic participants and three workshop co-organizers set out to explore, discuss and discover how video media could be employed by researchers. Our set up was a three-day intensive Videography Workshop featuring introductory lectures on key topics and approaches, fruitful discussions and, importantly, hands-on videography work covering the entire process of filmmaking (pre-production, production and post-production). We were lucky enough to occupy the Rouen Business School campus Château making the experience special in many ways. Find in the following some thoughts and insights from the workshop that – at least according to feedback from the participants – can be considered a good success.

First of all, the idea of this workshop was, on the one hand, to continue the series of inspiring and pioneering Video Ethnography workshops organized by Professors Russ Belk and Rob Kozinets some years back in connection to Consumer Culture Theory (CCT) conferences. On the other hand, the principal idea behind this event – perhaps distinguishing it from the previous ones – was to invite researchers together who already had at least some prior experience in video production or analysis, had questions about it, or had tried to shoot and edit film before, or who were looking for further advice in advancing their ongoing video projects. We wanted to cater for this group in particular by offering not only practical information about “how to do it” but also raise important questions about the practice of academic videography productions: Why should academics consider videographies as a means to produce, express and disseminate research? What is it good for? What does it mean to employ video media? What requirements, opportunities, limitations and approaches should be considered?

I wanted to invite two co-chairs for the event for a number of reasons. Joel Hietanen, my dear friend and co-author/filmmaker (not to mention co-writer of this blog), finished his Doctoral dissertation last summer on a fundamental topic to our workshop: “Videography in Consumer Culture Theory” – in short, a philosophical account on academic film productions (see link here). Joel’s task was thus to inspire, provoke, and stimulate discussion on a journey to philosophical trajectories in audiovisual research. His presentation excelled in that it introduced fundamental notions from Gilles Deleuze’s theorizing of cinema (see Joel’s posting on our workshop in this blog any day soon). The second co-chair I invited was Hannu Uotila, CEO of Rocketgang productions – a Helsinki-based video production company. Hannu’s role was to provide and facilitate a comprehensive account on the video production process from professional’s viewpoint (Hannu’s posting forthcoming in this blog soon too). Hannu’s experience in commercial video productinons – including ads, television programs, company films etc. – was essential in setting up the workshop learning experience. It is also worth mentioning that, just last week, Hannu was nominated to the list of “New Producers to Watch” by MIPTV event organized in Cannes, France (Hannu: We salute you! Congratulations!)

I tried to add my personal input somewhere between Joel and Hannu – between Deleuzian ephemera and hands-on concrete video productions – in attempting to position videography as a particular research approach and a useful tool for researchers and also to point our opportunities and challenges that videography may bring about. Among other things, I attempted to open up how traditions in documentary film theory, visual anthropology, experimental ethnography, and also artistic video projects may help us in charting and finding promising directions for videographers.

Finally, and most importantly, we left room for emergence and improvisation in that all the participants of the workshop engaged in filmmaking activity (in four teams). We planned, filmed, edited, produced and finalized four short films over the course of just two and half days! This videography challenge seemed impossible at first (see Hannu’s posting in this blog) but we were confident of success. All four groups finished their films in time and the screening of the films was certainly the climax of our workshop. Four amazing films of stunning quality! Great work from all the groups.

My own experience of organizing and pulling together the workshop was of course very special. Notably, it was absolutely great to receive such a perfect group of guests to my home school and city. In addition, I am astonished how many new ideas I/we got concerning both future videography productions and also the role of videography in the academia altogether. I am convinced we’re still taking some of the early steps in this regard! So let us continue… :)

Thanks everyone one more time! (and check out some photos from the action below..) We also wish to thank Rouen Business School research group Markets, Brands & Experiences for generous sponsorship.

August 15th, 2012 by Joonas Rokka

I recently wrote a piece on the Financial Times (July 2, 2012 Soapbox column) about doing research on video format. This was a great opportunity to spur the discussion about the changing academia. In fact, as a result, I got over a dozen of encouraging emails and feedback from professionals around the world. Basically, we all agreed that the academia needs to reconsider the ways in which breakthrough research should to be delivered and be accessible to wider audiences.

To briefly summarize my points – and btw the full article can be found behind this link – I argued it is unfortunate that given the ubiquitous technologies including online streaming platforms (YouTube, Vimeo, TedTalk etc.) that are increasingly available to us, academia does not make much use of them. Rather, it seems, research is published in paper format and disseminated in selected international academic journals, making the impact of research relatively limited, at last in terms of potential readership. Echoing themes we’ve discussed in this blog, there lies several benefits in using video to explain and share research findings. However, audio-visual techniques used in conducting research, i.e. doing videographies, or in publishing findings require new skills (shooting film, editing, storytelling etc.) and equipment that academics are not used to. In addition, the present academic publication system with a heavy focus on journal rankings plays an important role in this (lack of) development too, as it keeps researchers occupied with writing research papers for the journals and leaving little time to consider the exchanges with the public.

Our humble attempts to experiment research on video have shown some interesting results already (see below stories about our projects in more detail). Stay tuned for more.

The cartoon (by Roger Beale, FT.com) was pretty cool too!

April 14th, 2011 by Joel Hietanen

Ok, I lied. The concept of hiatus does not apply if one considers anything that we’ve been up to not pertaining specifically to this blog. What has now been going down behind the curtains has consisted of voluminous amounts of editing (my screen-glaring eyes look kinda funny now and the silver fox proportions of my integrated toupée have certainly been on the increase). The outcome consists of two ‘Film Festival’ submissions to ACR 2011 which I’ll be linking to when the review process has amounted to something tangible. Let’s see how those work out – fingers crossed!

The other submission (not the ‘Pushing the Scene’ -project that we’ve already documented below) we call ‘Post-Materialistic Work’ was a do-over of one of my Master’s thesis group students research. I’m glad to say he became the first Master’s student to graduate with a videography as the primary product – perhaps the first in the world from field of economics (his videography thesis was in the field of entrepreneurship, but the video data was reincarnated into a work of consumer culture theory in consumer research after quite a bit of revamping). So yes, one can now conduct a Master’s thesis as a work of videography in the Aalto University School of Economics in the marketing program! Within the nascent project MediaMark I have four such ongoing research initiatives. You’ll hear more about them soon enough!

To get things going again I just wanted to brazenly display some of our new gear. As we are still obvious amateurs our gear bag seems to forever be in a state of emergent flux. Here we are at the moment:

1_1

(From left to right, somewhat) Handytools Base-X, Rode SM3, Audio-Technica AT875R, Canon 60D, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 EX DC Macro, Rode Stereo Mic, Sigma 15mm F2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye, Canon 550D/T2i, Zoom H4, Redrock/Ops Running Man

1_2

(From left to right, somewhat) Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG APO Macro HSM II, Joby Gorillapod SLR, Silk Monopod 350, JVC GY-HM100U, Glidecam 2000

1_3

Our Canon 550D running the magical Magic Lantern software (with AGC disabled, audio meters, focus peak and zebras)!

Let’s see if these new babies will bring about a much anticipated improvement in quality (if I’ll ever be able to master any of them with my butterfingers).

I’ll be back with other news shortly on this same bat channel!

July 19th, 2010 by Joel Hietanen

In our previous project ‘Brothers-In-Paint’ we found it paramount to visit many contexts where the social practices of paintball culture take place. This allowed us to not take the site as the location of the culture, but rather the practices as the culture itself, not defined, but co-existing with the spatiotemporal ‘places’ of activity and agency. Thus we visited 6 countries in attempts to gain more insight and a translocal appreciation of the social practices.

Risto had made smoothly scheduled arrangements for us to meet the central figures of the New York scene, and for him to simultaneously play a set or two in various locales. Firstly, we met up with DaveQ and headed out to Brooklyn to be a part of a SubFM radio show. Risto (Desto) ended up hitting the decks also alongside such pioneers as DaveQ – thanks Dave for taking such great care of us!

subfm

Finding the studio can sometimes be somewhat puzzling.

subfm5

DaveQ on decks.

subfm4

AIM screen in the SubFM studio. The DJs we're in constant interaction with the audience.

subfm2

SubFM getting lively.

Later Risto was scheduled to play a set at a record store right under the Brooklyn Bridge. The place, Halcyon, was a vinyl enthusiasts playground and had a great soundsystem (especially considering it is a record store and not a club venue). Later Risto played at a venue called the White Rabbit. Too bad not so many people made it over. Fortunately, the interesting experience in Halcyon more than made up for this.

halcyon3

The Halcyon storefront.

halcyon1

Vinyl. Lots.

halcyon2

Desto at it again.

white2

Desto at White Rabbit.

white1

Pt. 2.

The main event for us, the Dub War 5 year anniversary, was truly a night to remember. We began by navigating through the masses of dubstep lovers making their pilgrimage. The place was packed like sardines in a crushed tin box already at ten when the party was only picking up. In terms of filming, we got amounts of intense contextual footage, and Risto did an admirable bit of legwork in order to grab such pioneers as Joe Nice and Alex Incyde, and the dubstep Internet forum creator Seckle for little back-and-forth with us in interesting back rooms and corridors while the party was booming. Even Skream popped into one of our interview sessions right behind the DJ booth – where we actually got quite a bit of action also. Thanks again to the New York scene for giving us such a warm welcome!

war3

Welcome to the Dub War 5 year anniversary!

war2

Desto, always listening.

war1

The booming night pt. 1.

alex

Incyde.

joenice

Joe Nice.

skream

Skream jumps in.

war6

The booming night pt. 2.

war5

Hard at work beside steam-leaking piping in the backroom.

During our walkabouts through Broadway we had additional time to think about our up-and-coming editing process. As Risto has become an increasingly central figure in our work, we went further in our preliminary ideas about the arc of drama in what is to become the final product. Our first project, Brothers-in-Paint, was very much a conservative article-like showcase of how to, for the lack of better terms, create a videography that resembled an article in video format. How it exactly came out so, we do not know, but I do still remember our original ethos of really exemplifying how a theoretical perspective could be depicted on video. In retrospect, we might have overdid it a tad bit. Now, while we wish to still make a theoretical case, we will attempt to incorporate a much more entertaining approach, with Risto’s autoethnographic commentary hopefully bringing about a more interesting, theatrical, and continuous story line.

But to match Risto’s insighful autoethnographic story, we need contextually founded footage in situ. And certainly, as experimentality goes, we have found one of the most demanding contexts equipment-wise. Dubstep is certainly loud and noisy, taking an evident toll in terms of video and audio quality. Fortunately, again, we have Risto to work his producer magic on the audio, and we do expect decent outcomes. Moreover, the lack of video footage quality is more than compensated for by the graininess of the context presenting itself right in-your-face with all its loudness. As Rob Kozinets has pointed out before, social practices are bright, noisy and messy. Without completely slipping into the rabbit hole at this point, it can be noted that it is this loudness and messiness we are aiming to represent. An interesting comment by Lisa Marks seems to bubble up here too, as she was known to have said that what the film represents is often dull, but nevertheless the impurities and the scratches on the film material itself are perpetually fascinating. I would agree, and that is why we are not afraid of grainy material, when such outcomes go on to represent the murkiness of the many contexts we were introduced to in our underground travels. Because we dare to profess love for the loudness and embrace the grittyness of some of the video material as our equipment are maxed out, we gain more confidence in our perspective – the contextual representation of social practices in close proximity.

In order to accomplish this, I believe strongly that the video ethnographer must do as little of obstruction as possible, and therefore all we shoot is uncompromisingly in situ. This means, that even with the implications for video quality, we will not use additional lights and we will not be sticking lapel microphones around peoples’ necks. In our adventures in the dubstep scene this has not been purely an question of preference either, as the promoters of many club venues will not permit lighting for video works. An important concern arises from this preferred modus operendi, however. Equipment truly matters. Indeed, there must be something seriously wrong with our heads, as we are conducting video work in probably one of the most hostile environments. It is dark (often and often very much so) and it is loud (have you felt the subbass causing tremors in your spine and jiggling the clothes on you). To pull this silly feat off, we are no longer going in with equipment more at home in capturing the kids making sandcastles on a sunny Mediterranean beach, where the food was delicious and the wine was just right. While still nowhere near a professional outfit, we are now donning a decent videocam and a back-up video DSLR with lenses specifically chosen to lure in all possible trickles of light in the illlit places we happen to enter. See the post before this one for a more technical perspective (and gripe) into the contents our gear bag.

Yet again, what would we be, if we were hauling lighting and microphones into sweat drenched rooms packed to the rim with euphoric music followers being blazed by the club lights and battered with subbass that you can feel in your spine? That’s right, a distraction, an obstruction. Worse than that, we could become what I as an ethnographer fear the most, a odd academic peculiarities flailing about a context that will never again give us a pass. No, to get close to that sweat, that pounding, that energy, we must and will continue to go in light. What you see is what you get. And what you get is noisy and bright.

We’ll leave you with a couple more memories. Soon to come, our continued adventures in London.

yleis3

yleis2

desto_broadway

moma

joel111

nyrkki

dubday