January 18th, 2016 by Joonas Rokka

This list hopes to facilitate access to full-length consumer research videographies screened previously in conferences (e.g. ACR, CCT, EMAC) or journals (e.g. CMC, QMR) over the last 10 years that are “free to view” online. I find it a common problem that many of the films are scattered around the net and difficult to find when needed. They are an excellent resource and certainly merit more attention – not to mention citations!

I reviewed all consumer research conference proceedings and journal special issues that I know have presented films. Then I tried my best to track down each film across video streaming sites or authors to see if they are available online (in full, free access). Please notify me if your film is still missing – I’d be happy to add all! I found a total of 33 films from 2005-2015. With an average 700+ views these films also prove they reach far beyond standard conference audiences.

Find here the full list (CLICK THE TITLE TO ACCESS FILMS):

2015

Cléret, Baptiste (2015) “Street Corner Compromises” ACR

Hietanen, Joel and Joonas Rokka (2015) “Monstrous Organizing: The Dubstep Electronic Music Scene” CCT / ACR / EMAC

 

2014

Bonnin, Gael, Alain Goudey and Marat Bakpayev (2014) “Meet the robot: Nao’s chronicle” ACR / EMAC

Rokka, Joonas, Pekka Rousi, and Vessi Hämäläinen (2014) “Follow me on dead media: analog authenticities in alternative skateboarding scene” ACR

van Laer, Tom, Luca Visconti and Stephanie Feiereisen (2014) “Need for narrative” ACR 

Veer, Ekant (2014) “I am struggling: men’s stories of mental illness” ACR

Wijland, Roel (2014) “In brutal times” ACR

 

2013

Myöhänen, Henri and Joel Hietanen (2013) “Entertained to excess: The contemporary practices of boredom” ACR

O’Sullivan, Stephen (2013) “What happens when brand evangelism meets entrepreneurship? Introducing the second tier tribal entrepreneur” EACR

Ramachandran, Giridhar (2013) “Consumption communities as third spaces” ACR

Rokka, Joonas, Baptiste Cléret and Alice Sohier (2013) “Entre-deux-mondes: the shaping of artistic projects in a local music scene” ACR

Seregina, Anastasia, Norah Cambell, Bernardo Figueiredo and Hannu Uotila (2013) “A Pen” ACR

 

2012

Barretta, Paul and Yi-Chia Wu (2012) “Perceptions of music authenticity” ACR

Viitala, Karolus and Hietanen, Joel (2012) “Differing everydays – Planning and emergence in contemporary mundane routines” ACR

 

2011

Hietanen, Joel, Joonas Rokka, and Risto Roman (2011) “Pushing the scene – tensions and emergence in an accelerated marketplace culture” ACR / EACR

Hu, Anne and Curtis Haugvegt (2011) “Changing consumer behavior in diet and health” ACR

Uotila, Hannu and Joel Hietanen (2011) “Post-materialist work: Emerging self-actualization in the video industry” ACR

 

2010

Caldwell, Marylouise and Ingeborg Kleppe (2010) “Walk the talk: Living positive with HIV” ACR

Castano, Raquel, Maria Eugenia Perez and Claudia Quintanilla (2010) “Cross-border shopping: family narratives” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 45-57.

Cherrier, Hélène and Tresa Ponnor (2010) “Trash in the eye of the beholder” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 8-23.

Rabikowska, Marta (2010) “Whose street is it anyway? Visual ethnography and self-reflection” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 58-83.

Webster, Cynthia, Richard Seymour and Kate Dallenbach (2010) “Behind closed doors: opportunity identification through observational research” Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 24-35.

 

2009

Eckhardt, Giana and Andreas Bengtsson (2009) “Naturalistic group interviewing in China” ACR / (2010) Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 36-44.

Fleck, Joao Pedro, Carlos Rossi and Nicolas Tonsho (2009) “Vinileiros” ACR

Rokka, Joonas, Joel Hietanen and Kristine DeValck (2009) “Brothers in paint: a practice-oriented inquiry to tribal marketplace culture” ACR

 

2008

Caldwell, Marylouise and Paul Henry (2008) “Urban archetypal hedonistas” ACR / (2010) Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 84-96.

Veer, Ekant (2008) “This day is to be special: The role of exaggerated contrast in the Indian wedding” ACR

 

2007 

Henry, Paul and Marylouise Caldwell (2007) “A right to life: reducing maternal death in Pakistan” ACR

Kjeldgaard, Dannie and Jacob Östberg (2007) “Coffee Grounds and the Global Cup” Consumption Markets and Culture, Vol. 10, No. 2, 175-187.

 

2006

Caldwell, Marylouise and Paul Henry (2006) “Headbanging as resistance or refuge?” ACR

Ulusoy, Ebru (2006) “Not Desperate Houswives”, ACR

 

2005

Bengtsson, Andreas, Jacob Östberg and Dannie Kjeldgaard (2005) “Prisoners in paradise: subcultural resistance to the marketization of tattooing” Consumption Markets and Culture, Vol 8, No. 3, 261-274.

Bergvall, Sven and Jacob Östberg (2005) “Burning Bock” ACR

 

 

June 18th, 2010 by Joonas Rokka

In addition to the themes covered in the previous posting, here’s to summarize some of this year’s sessions (with a couple of notes linking to our own project). The themes included: new research methods, postmodern and ethnic consumption, challenges linked to public goods/services, class dynamics and consumption, consumer culture in third world countries, consumer resistance/culture jamming, culture and ideology, market-mediated relationships, the contested notion of place that shapes consumer experiences, femininity, consumer-marketer co-creation, community and family, mediated images and ideologies of body and health, consumer identity practices, critical questions on consumer culture terminology, and finally, socio-cultural construction of authenticity — session where we presented this time.

I particularly liked the session on new methods. Visual Analysis (VA) was explored as a tool for gaining cultural insight on consumer behavior and practices. Kristen San Jose presented a piece in which she applied VA in the context of fashion consumption in Tokyo. Although there’s a long tradition of visual research in CCT, I agree that there’s plenty of future opportunities in this regard. For instance, researchers (and companies alike) often rely on text-based analyses. For us, it would be interesting to extend VA also towards moving images / video, something I haven’t seen yet. Adding nicely to the session, Alex Thompson’s presentation brought about interesting views on how companies perceive and conceptualize consumers, in a study where commercial ethnography was the focus. I liked the way in which video was used as a means to communicate consumer knowledge to company executives — this nicely contrasts with more traditional ppt presentations and figures we’re used to. Alex’s points about different mechanisms at play, including rituals, embodiment and symbols, are something video really can capture in an intriguing way.

Another interesting session set out to re-conceptualize the contested notion of place. Drawing insights from material culture theory, Jeppe Trolle Linnet’s presentation shed light on material and social aspects of place and space in the context of home and homeyness (what he called ‘hygge’ in Danish). It was interesting to see how this hygge is constructed and negotiated in different settings, not only at home but also in other social places such as neighborhoods or communities. They act as a sort of social comfort zone, a cozy, warm, and safe environment that is distinguished from other non-hyggelig, cold, and modern places. In a closely related study Zeynep Arsel and Jonathan Bean presented on ‘apartment therapy’ — a conduct in which people modify their homes through interior design to better match their desires. In our own research we’re also interested in how such interlinked and mediated cultural spaces and sites are at play.

In the co-creation session, several papers sought to understand the cultural dialogue and co-creation between consumers and producers/marketers. Robert Harrison presented a fascinating paper on Black Friday – a sort of corporate ritual and event which is largely the result of consumer’s active participation during a consumption event. Another really nice paper was by Daiane Scaraboto and Rob Kozinets who investigated the community of geo-cacaching — a sort of GPS treasure hunt game invented and organized by consumers. This study showed how consumer’s infinite innovative potential, playfulness, and creativity plays an important role in the creation of a new markets — exactly what we’re also seeing our own study.

Finally, our own session in which authenticity was explored as an essential component and a driver of culture. I think the session was very interesting as it nicely brought together three distinct viewpoints on authenticity — namely brand, place, and consumption-production interplay. As it was noted, in consumer research authenticity is often investigated by looking at consumer perceptions, and it is commonly tied to certain objects (e.g. brands), lifestyles, or places. In our presentation on electronic music culture, we wanted to consider how authenticity — which often drives cultural change in (music) culture — is actually achieved and negotiated by different influential cultural agents. In our study these agents in fact simultaneously adopt the role of producers, DJs, and consumers. We also brought with us our new research team member Risto (aka Desto) who is an authoethnographic member in our research team and a DJ/producer himself. This move was very well received, and we had lots of lively discussions after our presentation. Thanks for everyone involved!

IMG_0210

IMG_0214

IMG_0218

Some pics from our presentation at CCT5

Overall this fifth annual CCT conference pointed out many interesting future directions. Especially, the increasing attention to spatial and embodied aspects of culture as well as emphasis on creative methodologies — including audiovisual and multi-method approaches — brings to the fore new thrilling work that is currently emerging.

February 1st, 2010 by Joonas Rokka

My inspiration for video research was spurred by a few occurrences that took place in 2006-7. Firstly, I had just jumped on to my doctoral studies at the Helsinki School of Economics (currently known as Aalto University School of Economics) the previous year and was anxiously looking for new potential topics for my thesis work. I soon discovered that I needed to look outside of Finland to be able to find something interesting.

As it happened, I found myself first on an intensive course on Consumer Culture Theory (Odense, Denmark) headed by some of the most renowned figures in cultural consumer research, including Eric Arnould and Craig Thompson. The course instantly set the tone for my future work: I was caught to study the cultural aspects of consumption and consumer society from emerging approaches that stem largely from cultural anthropology and sociology.

Not long after, I took part in my first research congress: the 2nd Consumer Culture Theory Conference 2007 (at York University). This annual conference was organized for researchers employing qualitative, interpretive, ethnographic, videographic, netnographic and phenomenological approaches, in other words, in many ways emerging, if not completely novel approaches considering the dominant corpus of work within consumer and marketing research.

CCT conference was a success in many ways, not least because it also offered conjoined workshops designed for new students entering the field. I took part in the Video Ethnography Workshop, which was held for the third time. The purpose of this two-day workshop was to experience videographic research in a hands-on manner, guided by experts. After opening lectures on video-based research production, student teams were given camcorders and editing software as well as professional assistance for designing a small-scale video study in practice. By the end of the workshop we also presented our videos and received feedback.

30052007203

29052007200

28052007192

Pics from the workshop.

During the assignment I ran into my future co-author, Kristine de Valck from HEC Paris. We conducted a video study in a local shopping mall interviewing and observing consumers about their personal styles. We got to experience some on-field action and stumbled upon a number of challenges typical for video research including 1) the difficulty of gaining access to people in such public environments and 2) the trouble of presenting camera in interview settings without scaring people away instantly. Despite of these, we managed to shoot some footage that we could edit and produce into a short film – my first videographic experiment.

The videography event was organized by Russell Belk and Robert Kozinets who have written several articles and book chapters about video research (see Belk and Kozinets 2005; Kozinets and Belk 2006). They have also founded the Association for Consumer Research Film Festival. Held annually in the North American ACR conference and in rotating years in Europe, Latin America and Asia Pacific, the film festival has spawned considerable interest among consumer researchers now for over 9 years.

As soon as the workshop was behind, I began to ponder how video research could work out for me. What is it good for? What makes it so compelling? Why hasn’t it been used previously? What new avenues could be opened up? Soon Kristine asked, if I could join her in Paris and to come up with a brand new video project. I knew this would be the perfect chance, so I was in…

References:

Belk, R.W. & Kozinets, R.V. (2005) Videography in Marketing and Consumer Research. Qualitative Market Research, 8, 128-141.

Kozinets, R.V. & Belk, R.W. (2006). Camcorder Society: Quality Videography in Consumer and Marketing Research. In Handbook of Qualitative Research Methods in Marketing, R.W. Belk (ed), Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited.